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The New Naija-Blogger Dictionary

Comprehending the scrolls just got easier with the New Naija-Blogger Dictionary! No longer do you have to scratch your head and wonder “what the hell is that supposed to mean”? The New Naija Blogger Dictionary provides definitions and translations of Nigerian pidgin english terminologies, slangs and colloquialisms as used in blog articles, arranged in alphabetical order. Enjoy!

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Abeg
Please. I beg of you.
Variant: Abegi.
Used in: How to Play the African King: A Guide for Nigerian Actors Trying to “Hammer”

Alabukun
A local analgesic which comes in powdery form and is sold in paper wrappings.
Used in: How to Play the African King: A Guide for Nigerian Actors Trying to “Hammer”

All na movement
They’re all means of transportation.
Used in: The 6 Biggest Myths About Nigerian Theatre (Part 1)

All that one na sufferhead
All of that is just self-imposed stress.
Used in: How to Play the African King: A Guide for Nigerian Actors Trying to “Hammer”

Area Boy(s)
One or a group of men infamous for their thuggish behaviour, who hang around public places causing a nuisance and maybe participating in small to large scale criminal activity.

As him money don troway, chairman pack him load run
Having lost money in a bad investment, the businessman got out of the business rapidly.
Used in: Part 2 – The 6 Biggest Myths About Nigerian Theatre

At least they tried sha
Well, at least they tried. At least they gave it a shot.
Used in: The Grand Nollywood Plan … Or Lack Thereof

Babalawo
Yoruba language word for a witchdoctor.
Used in: How to Play the African King: A Guide for Nigerian Actors Trying to “Hammer”

Barawo
Hausa language word for a thief.
Used in: Oga at the Top: A Master Lesson for the Nigerian Actor.

Barawo like you!
You thief!
Used in: Oga at the Top: A Master Lesson for the Nigerian Actor.

Bone
1. Scowl. Keep a poker face. Maintain a blank and unemotional glare.
2. To ignore, forget about or abandon something. (e.g Guy, see, bone that thing!)
Used in: How to Play the African King: A Guide for Nigerian Actors Trying to “Hammer”

Chop liver
Grow some balls. Be courageous.
Used in: Part 2 – The 6 Biggest Myths About Nigerian Theatre

Chopping
1. Eating.
2. Earning.
3. (Related to money) the act of earning high profits or making excessive amounts of money.
Used in: Part 2 – The 6 Biggest Myths About Nigerian Theatre

Di
The.
Used in: Oga at the Top: A Master Lesson for the Nigerian Actor.

Don Jazzy
1. A popular Nigerian music producer and mogul.
2. A highly respected and influential leader of a group.
3. Someone who thinks he is a highly respected and influential leader of a group.
4. To act in a bossy manner; to adopt an attitude that demands respect.
Used in: Part 2 – The 6 Biggest Myths About Nigerian Theatre

E
It.
Used in: Oga at the Top: A Master Lesson for the Nigerian Actor.

E no suppose be like dis, I suppose don hammer by now
Things aren’t supposed to still be so, I should be a millionaire/billionaire/trillionaire by now.
Used in: Part 2 – The 6 Biggest Myths About Nigerian Theatre

Even if e give you headache
Even if it gives you a headache.
Used in: Oga at the Top: A Master Lesson for the Nigerian Actor.

Gaas huzzle
Have/has/had to hustle.
Used in: How to Play the African King: A Guide for Nigerian Actors Trying to “Hammer”

Ginger
1. A slang term for an exuberant, high energy state of mind or being.
2. To excite or nudge someone into this state of mind or being.
3. To motivate someone into doing something. (e.g Why don’t you ginger him to fill his tank so that we can have a car to take to the club?)
Used in: How to Play the African King: A Guide for Nigerian Actors Trying to “Hammer”

Hammer
To make a considerable amount of money, whether by legal or illegal means.
Hammering: the act or process of coming into said money.
Used in: How to Play the African King: A Guide for Nigerian Actors Trying to “Hammer”

Him nor sabi di thing
He is clueless about it.
Used in: Oga at the Top: A Master Lesson for the Nigerian Actor.

Hustle
1. The daily bustle a citizen endures while trying to hammer (see above).
2. Any activity, which may or may not be shady, expected to culminate in the acquisition of money.
Used in: i) The 6 Biggest Myths About Nigerian Theatre (Part 1) ii) Part 2 – The 6 Biggest Myths About Nigerian Theatre

Huzzle
Variant of hustle. Made popular by touts or ‘area boys’ (see above).
Used in: i) Of Public Piety and Private Putrescence: What Does the Anti-Gay Law Say About Nigerians? ii) How to Play the African King: A Guide for Nigerian Actors Trying to “Hammer”

If na your money you go gree?
If it was your money/investment (at stake) would you be okay with that?
Used in: The 6 Biggest Myths About Nigerian Theatre (Part 1)

If so God punish am!
If it is true then I pray God unleashes horrendous punishments upon him/her/them.
Used in: The 6 Biggest Myths About Nigerian Theatre (Part 1)

Ijebu-garri
A popular variation of swallow (see below) produced mainly by Yorubas of the Ijebu region.
Used in: Part 2 – The 6 Biggest Myths About Nigerian Theatre

Just-manage-am-like-that
Look, just manage it as it is.
Used in: The Grand Nollywood Plan … Or Lack Thereof

Lasgidi
A nickname for Lagos state..
Used in: Dear Nollywood … A Love Letter

Make I use google form effizy o jare
Why don’t I take advantage of accessibility to information I know nothing about, through google, to make myself look posh and cultured.
Used in: The 6 Biggest Myths About Nigerian Theatre (Part 1)

Na
Is. Was.
Used in: The 6 Biggest Myths About Nigerian Theatre (Part 1)

Na-based-on-who-you-sabi society
A society in which progress is dependent on influential contacts not merit or capability.
Used in: The 6 Biggest Myths About Nigerian Theatre (Part 1)

Na joke, ah!
It’s just a joke, come on.
Used in: Oga at the Top: A Master Lesson for the Nigerian Actor.

Na one road for Lasgidi
It’s a road in Lagos state.
Used in: Part 2 – The 6 Biggest Myths About Nigerian Theatre

No-be-our-fault
It’s not our fault. We’re not at fault. We’re not to blame.
Used in: The Grand Nollywood Plan … Or Lack Thereof

O’boy
Casual term of reference for a male. Young fellow. Old boy. Old chap.
Used in: How to Play the African King: A Guide for Nigerian Actors Trying to “Hammer”

O’boy that guy sabi act oh, see as him just dey ginger
Whoa, that guy is such a good actor, see how energetic he is!
Used in: How to Play the African King: A Guide for Nigerian Actors Trying to “Hammer”

Oversabi
1. Used in an adulatory or derogatory sense in regards to someone who is very knowledgable or likes to appear as highly knowledgable.
2. Someone who makes a big deal out of little things often with a pompous or stubborn attitude.
Used in: i) The 6 Biggest Myths About Nigerian Theatre (Part 1), ii) Used in: How to Play the African King: A Guide for Nigerian Actors Trying to “Hammer”

Oyibo
1. Used to refer to a caucasian.
2. Used to refer to a Nigerian (or African) who behaves like a caucasian, in dressing, mannerisms, speech, etc often in a playful or mocking sense.
3. Used to refer to a light-skinned Nigerian (or African).
Used in: i) Of Public Piety and Private Putrescence: What Does the Anti-Gay Law Say About Nigerians? ii) Breaking: Nigerian Scientist Discovers New Treatment Which Completely Prevents Ebola

Paroles
1. An activity which can never be specified or clearly explained but which requires an excessive amount of time. And almost always involves only 2 people.
2. A hustle or huzzle (see above). Runs (see below).
Used in: Part 2 – The 6 Biggest Myths About Nigerian Theatre

Popcorn go dey finish for cinema
We’d be running out of popcorn in cinema’s.
Used in Oga at the Top: A Master Lesson for the Nigerian Actor.

Pishaun-pishuan

A gimmicky sound used as special effects sound of a gunshot in some Nigerian movies or by kids at play.

Used in: 5 Things to Avoid When Making Your Nollywood Action Film (Part 1)

Pure-water
1. A type of water with varying degrees of odd taste which is sold in transparent sachets at very cheap prices.
2. A thing of little value.
Used in: Part 2 – The 6 Biggest Myths About Nigerian Theatre

Runs
A hustle/huzzle (see above).

Runs-girl
1. A vaginal entrepreneur.
2. A female, typically based in (but not limited to) Lagos or Abuja, who hustles a flamboyant life by trading sex in exchange for money and expensive items, typically from politicians, celebrities and successful yahoo-yahoo boys (see below).
Used in: Part 2 – The 6 Biggest Myths About Nigerian Theatre

Sabi
To know or be able to do something.
Used in: Oga at the Top: A Master Lesson for the Nigerian Actor.

Sharp-sharp
Quickly. Rapidly. Often with a sense of skill or furtiveness.
Used in: Part 2 – The 6 Biggest Myths About Nigerian Theatre

Shekpe

1. Locally brewed spirit/liquor.

2. Any generic or low quality spirit/liquor sold at cheap prices.

Used in: 5 Things to Avoid When Making Your Nollywood Action Film (Part 1)

Sufferhead
1a. A condition of being burdened or burdening oneself with an unnecessary amount of work, information etc.
1b. An activity which takes up more effort than is required.
2. General suffering in life.
Used in: Part 2 – The 6 Biggest Myths About Nigerian Theatre

Swallow
Nigerian slang term for various pasty traditional foods (such as eba, fufu, amala etc.) made from the flour of cassava, maize, etc which are eaten with traditional soups such as egusi or ogbono. Due to its soft and mouldable nature, when eaten the food is not chewed but swallowed directly, hence the slang.
Used in: How to Play the African King: A Guide for Nigerian Actors Trying to “Hammer”

The ministry is moving
A popular saying (typically among the Christian community) which basically means things are progressing in one’s favour, usually due to religious guidance combined with the strength of one’s hustle. Connotation could also suggest that one’s following (i.e his/her ministry) is progressing along with the positive developments. Made popular by famous Nigerian comedian named Gordons.
Used in: How to Play the African King: A Guide for Nigerian Actors Trying to “Hammer”

Wetin else we wan call am?
What else are we going to call it? How else are we going to refer to it?
Used in: Part 2 – The 6 Biggest Myths About Nigerian Theatre

Where your own dey?
Where’s yours?
Used in: The 6 Biggest Myths About Nigerian Theatre (Part 1)

Yawa dey gas
The shit hits the fan.
Used in: Part 2 – The 6 Biggest Myths About Nigerian Theatre

Yahoo-yahoo
Fraud, especially, but not limited to, internet fraud.
Used in: Of Public Piety and Private Putrescence: What Does the Anti-Gay Law Say About Nigerians?

Yahoo-yahoo boy
A fraudster, con-man. One who perpetrates the act of fraud.
Used in: Of Public Piety and Private Putrescence: What Does the Anti-Gay Law Say About Nigerians?

You sha have body sha
Either way you have some sort of a large physical form.
Used in: How to Play the African King: A Guide for Nigerian Actors Trying to “Hammer”

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